Wednesday, October 19, 2011

The never-ending paintings

I have come to realize that my paintings have no real state of completion.  The last week or so, I haven't been working my day job, so it was time to attack some of my previous works.  I was sitting on my floor contemplating which one of my paintings that i should re-evaluate when the thought came to me that this "re-evaluation" process is essential to the development of each of my paintings.

My process for creating and selling art is a "trial and error" type symbiotic relationship between myself, the viewer, the buyer and my own insufferable obssessions.  Typically I will work on a piece until I feel it is complete, or can serve some purpose for me.  I will then try to put the work on display either on my wall or somewhere where a potential buyer might make an inquiry.  example of first stage work.



I hung up these two pieces separately at a gallery for a good 5 months before deciding to pull them down and think on them for a while.  As I became bored and conflicted with the imagery of the two examples, i re-evaluated them.  Through frustration and stagnant artistic boredome, I began to change them.  First with spraypaint and oil pastels.  What resulted was one interesting piece that I talked about in my last post:



This painting then sat in the corner of my studio as I subconciously obssessed about it's lack of completeness.
I once again got bored and took the piece into the studio.  I begun to change it to work as a dyptic with the other piece above.

Here is a picture of my studio so far:



The two pieces together will have a nice feel and sensibility.  I feel like I have been planning the pairing since i created the two separate peices together.  I am always amazed at the results that come from potentially risky behavior both in the studio and in life.  When you see a painting of mine, there are usually several versions of the painting buried in the paint.  Every layer adds to the texture and life of the painting.  Its artistic karma.

BTW:  The painting on the eisel on the floor used to be this painting:




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